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Invoice Number AIGP-0398
Order Number 2870
Invoice Date 12 August 2022
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Itransition: Software Development Company
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1AI Guest Post
  • Brand: Global Health and Pharma (£150.00) £150.00
  • Select Publication Date: 2022-08-18
  • Number of images/videos: 1 (£0.00)
  • Media 1: Image or video?: Image (£0.00)
  • Media 1: Upload image:
    img-1500x1000-1.jpg
  • Total number of words: 750-1000 (£10.00) £10.00
  • Article title: COVID-19 as an interoperability driver
  • Article text: EHR interoperability has become an omnipresent
    challenge. In 2020, before the pandemic struck, the issue got on the list of [*nolink https://www.statista.com/statistics/1214222/leading-health-innovation-priorities-before-the-covid-pandemic/ *]the top 6 leading health innovation priorities[*endlink*]. However, with the pandemic
    wreaking havoc across the US, the priority of interoperability skyrocketed. Why
    so? To solve the pandemic challenges efficiently, providers needed to ensure health
    information availability. This motivated [*link https://www.itransition.com/healthcare/ehr *]Itransition[*endlink*] and
    other vendors to provide EHR
    optimization services with the focus on interoperability. And
    there came a challenge previously unacknowledged—the sheer number of diverse
    EHR systems in use.

    [*subheading*]Scope underestimated[*endsubheading*]

    Though the majority of providers use several EHR
    solutions, these tools may be fragmented. On
    average, a single provider can employ as many as [*nolink https://spectrum.ieee.org/ehr-pandemic-promises-not-kept *]16
    disparate EHRs[*endlink*] across their affiliated practices.
    Besides, the logic and structure of those solutions are not identical. Some of
    them may have specific ways of capturing and storing health information.

    While in some cases it’s about the need
    for specialty solutions (behavioral health, oncology, etc.), in other it’s
    nothing but the lack of productive dialogue among partners. Luckily, industry
    stakeholders came up with promoting another way of sharing health
    information—establishing health information exchanges (HIEs).

    [*subheading*]HIE:
    what & how[*endsubheading*]

    Health information exchanges are programmatic
    solutions that allow hospitals, providers, their patients, labs, and other
    medical facilities to exchange patients’ medical information easily and
    securely. These solutions spare the key actors the trouble of integrating with
    disparate medical systems. Besides, timely sharing vital patient
    information can power informed decision-making at the point of care and allow
    providers to:

    ·        
    Reduce unplanned readmissions

    ·        
    Avoid medication errors

    ·        
    Improve diagnostics

    ·        
    End duplicative testing

    Given the
    promise HIEs hold, state governments have taken up the solutions and started
    investing in them. As a result, diverse HIEs operate statewide and cross-state.

    Statewide HEIs in the COVID-19
    fightStatewide HIEs work like a network cast across several
    providers. Interestingly, the partnership among participating providers is not
    a prerequisite here. These statewide networks link several providers without
    establishing a connection between facilities and are capable of identifying
    health trends. Such HIEs assisted in clinicians’ work during the pandemic
    crisis in several states.

    Integrated with the Southern Nevada health district
    and the State Public Health Lab, HealtHIE Nevada provided seamless access to
    the health district reports data and coronavirus test results. Besides,
    HealtHIE’s team prepared electronic case reports for the Southern
    Nevada health district. This effort consists in packaging up COVID-19-positive patients’
    medical information together with follow-up recommendations. The team also
    tracked other conditions and diseases that might affect the patient’s recovery
    process. What’s more, the HIE offers access
    to its portal, HealtHIE Chart, free of charge. This solution stores the medical
    records of all Nevada residents.

    Another statewide HIE, KONZA, has assisted in the COVID-19
    fight across Kansas. KONZA offered de-identified information of COVID-positive patients admitted into a hospital or
    the ER. The HIE also provided an alerting platform that allowed users to track
    their patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 or suspected of being infected
    across the state’s hospitals. This allows care providers to stay informed about
    their patient’s health situation even if they got admitted to a hospital out of
    their hometown. In their turn, clinicians from the receiving hospital could
    gain access to longitudinal medical data on that patient, including information
    about chronic conditions, previous care episodes, medication plans, and
    allergies. This considerably improved care efficiency in critical situations.

    As the initial effort proved successful amidst the
    COVID-19 pandemic, KONZA’s team decided to take a step further and offer
    valuable data to hospitals and providers that have seen a recent upsurge in
    COVID-19 cases free of charge and regardless of their geographic location.
    Today KONZA spans the home state of Kanzas, Missouri, South
    Carolina, Georgia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Louisiana, and Mississippi. However, there’s a limitation here.
    With KONZA, hospitals and healthcare providers can only view the data on
    patients on site. Downloading or sharing the data among clinicians is not
    available. At the same time, such roadblocks power the rise of full-scale
    regional HIEs.

    [*subheading*]Regional
    HIEs on the rise[*endsubheading*]

    Amidst
    the pandemic, directors of several statewide HIEs have recognized the need to
    ensure health information availability beyond state borders. Aiming to expand their coverage and
    service offer, six successful HIEs created a new entity—Consortium for State and Regional Interoperability
    (CSRI) in February 2021.

     

    The new network is to unite HIEs across California,
    Nebraska, Iowa, Maryland, District of Columbia, Arizona, Indiana, and Colorado.
    Now the HIEs stakeholders work on harmonizing their
    technologies and standards to provide seamless interoperability and deliver
    common services. Launching CSRI will mean setting up a large health data
    utility that stores medical records of 80 million US patients.

    [*subheading*]Summing
    up[*endsubheading*]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has put the US healthcare system
    under enormous stress. However, in these turbulent times, providers and health
    IT vendors have invested a lot of effort to ensure interoperability and
    full-scale health information availability in one way or another. While
    interoperability roadblocks still exist, projects like CSRI look inspiring.
    They prove providers and their IT partners are willing to go the extra mile to
    ensure interoperability via technology harmonization and standardization. At
    some point, those efforts may lead to ensuring health information
    interoperability nationwide.















































     

_Brand: Global Health and Pharma (£150.00) £150.00
_Select Publication Date: 2022-08-18
_Number of images/videos: 1 (£0.00)
_Media 1: Image or video?: Image (£0.00)
_Media 1: Upload image: img-1500x1000-1.jpg
_Total number of words: 750-1000 (£10.00) £10.00
_Do-Follow links: 1
_Article title: COVID-19 as an interoperability driver
_Article text: EHR interoperability has become an omnipresent challenge. In 2020, before the pandemic struck, the issue got on the list of [*nolink https://www.statista.com/statistics/1214222/leading-health-innovation-priorities-before-the-covid-pandemic/ *]the top 6 leading health innovation priorities[*endlink*]. However, with the pandemic wreaking havoc across the US, the priority of interoperability skyrocketed. Why so? To solve the pandemic challenges efficiently, providers needed to ensure health information availability. This motivated [*link https://www.itransition.com/healthcare/ehr *]Itransition[*endlink*] and other vendors to provide EHR optimization services with the focus on interoperability. And there came a challenge previously unacknowledged—the sheer number of diverse EHR systems in use. [*subheading*]Scope underestimated[*endsubheading*] Though the majority of providers use several EHR solutions, these tools may be fragmented. On average, a single provider can employ as many as [*nolink https://spectrum.ieee.org/ehr-pandemic-promises-not-kept *]16 disparate EHRs[*endlink*] across their affiliated practices. Besides, the logic and structure of those solutions are not identical. Some of them may have specific ways of capturing and storing health information. While in some cases it’s about the need for specialty solutions (behavioral health, oncology, etc.), in other it’s nothing but the lack of productive dialogue among partners. Luckily, industry stakeholders came up with promoting another way of sharing health information—establishing health information exchanges (HIEs). [*subheading*]HIE: what & how[*endsubheading*] Health information exchanges are programmatic solutions that allow hospitals, providers, their patients, labs, and other medical facilities to exchange patients’ medical information easily and securely. These solutions spare the key actors the trouble of integrating with disparate medical systems. Besides, timely sharing vital patient information can power informed decision-making at the point of care and allow providers to: ·         Reduce unplanned readmissions ·         Avoid medication errors ·         Improve diagnostics ·         End duplicative testing Given the promise HIEs hold, state governments have taken up the solutions and started investing in them. As a result, diverse HIEs operate statewide and cross-state. Statewide HEIs in the COVID-19 fightStatewide HIEs work like a network cast across several providers. Interestingly, the partnership among participating providers is not a prerequisite here. These statewide networks link several providers without establishing a connection between facilities and are capable of identifying health trends. Such HIEs assisted in clinicians’ work during the pandemic crisis in several states. Integrated with the Southern Nevada health district and the State Public Health Lab, HealtHIE Nevada provided seamless access to the health district reports data and coronavirus test results. Besides, HealtHIE’s team prepared electronic case reports for the Southern Nevada health district. This effort consists in packaging up COVID-19-positive patients’ medical information together with follow-up recommendations. The team also tracked other conditions and diseases that might affect the patient’s recovery process. What’s more, the HIE offers access to its portal, HealtHIE Chart, free of charge. This solution stores the medical records of all Nevada residents. Another statewide HIE, KONZA, has assisted in the COVID-19 fight across Kansas. KONZA offered de-identified information of COVID-positive patients admitted into a hospital or the ER. The HIE also provided an alerting platform that allowed users to track their patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 or suspected of being infected across the state’s hospitals. This allows care providers to stay informed about their patient’s health situation even if they got admitted to a hospital out of their hometown. In their turn, clinicians from the receiving hospital could gain access to longitudinal medical data on that patient, including information about chronic conditions, previous care episodes, medication plans, and allergies. This considerably improved care efficiency in critical situations. As the initial effort proved successful amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, KONZA’s team decided to take a step further and offer valuable data to hospitals and providers that have seen a recent upsurge in COVID-19 cases free of charge and regardless of their geographic location. Today KONZA spans the home state of Kanzas, Missouri, South Carolina, Georgia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Louisiana, and Mississippi. However, there’s a limitation here. With KONZA, hospitals and healthcare providers can only view the data on patients on site. Downloading or sharing the data among clinicians is not available. At the same time, such roadblocks power the rise of full-scale regional HIEs. [*subheading*]Regional HIEs on the rise[*endsubheading*] Amidst the pandemic, directors of several statewide HIEs have recognized the need to ensure health information availability beyond state borders. Aiming to expand their coverage and service offer, six successful HIEs created a new entity—Consortium for State and Regional Interoperability (CSRI) in February 2021.   The new network is to unite HIEs across California, Nebraska, Iowa, Maryland, District of Columbia, Arizona, Indiana, and Colorado. Now the HIEs stakeholders work on harmonizing their technologies and standards to provide seamless interoperability and deliver common services. Launching CSRI will mean setting up a large health data utility that stores medical records of 80 million US patients. [*subheading*]Summing up[*endsubheading*] The COVID-19 pandemic has put the US healthcare system under enormous stress. However, in these turbulent times, providers and health IT vendors have invested a lot of effort to ensure interoperability and full-scale health information availability in one way or another. While interoperability roadblocks still exist, projects like CSRI look inspiring. They prove providers and their IT partners are willing to go the extra mile to ensure interoperability via technology harmonization and standardization. At some point, those efforts may lead to ensuring health information interoperability nationwide.  
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Total:£144.00